Call (800) 766-1884 for Oracle support & training
Free Oracle Tips


Oracle Consulting Support
Oracle Upgrades
Use New Oracle Features
Oracle Replication Support
Oracle Training
Remote Oracle DBA
System Documentation
Oracle Tips
Oracle Performance
 

Free Oracle Tips


 

HTML Text

BC Oracle tuning

Oracle training

Oracle support

Remote Oracle

 

 

   
 

Tuning Oracle Sorting


Oracle Tips by Burleson
 

As a small but very important component of SQL syntax, sorting is a frequently overlooked aspect of Oracle tuning. In general, an Oracle database will automatically perform sorting operations on row data as requested by a create index or an SQL ORDER BY or GROUP BY statement. In general, Oracle sorting occurs under the following circumstances:

  • SQL using the ORDER BY clause

  • SQL using the GROUP BY clause

  • When an index is created

  • When a MERGE SORT is invoked by the SQL optimizer because inadequate indexes exist for a table join

At the time a session is established with Oracle, a private sort area is allocated in RAM memory for use by the session for sorting. If the connection is via a dedicated connection, a Program Global Area (PGA) is allocated according to the sort_area_size Oracle parameter. For connections via the multithreaded server, sort space is allocated in the large_pool. Unfortunately, the amount of memory used in sorting must be the same for all sessions, and it is not possible to add additional sort areas for tasks that require large sort operations. Therefore, the designer must strike a balance between allocating enough sort area to avoid disk sorts for the large sorting tasks, keeping in mind that the extra sort area will be allocated and not used by tasks that do not require intensive sorting. Of course, sorts that cannot fit into the sort_area_size will be paged out into the TEMP tablespaces for a disk sort. Disk sorts are about 14,000 times slower than memory sorts.

As we noted, the size of the private sort area is determined by the sort_area_size Oracle parameter. The size for each individual sort is specified by the sort_area_ retained_size Oracle parameter. Whenever a sort cannot be completed within the assigned space, a disk sort is invoked using the temporary tablespace for the Oracle instance.

Disk sorts are expensive for several reasons. First, they are extremely slow when compared to an in-memory sort. Also, a disk sort consumes resources in the temporary tablespace. Oracle must also allocate buffer pool blocks to hold the blocks in the temporary tablespace. In-memory sorts are always preferable to disk sorts, and disk sorts will surely slow down an individual task as well as impact concurrent tasks on the Oracle instance. Also, excessive disk sorting will cause a high value for free buffer waits, paging other tasks' data blocks out of the buffer.

The following STATSPACK query uses the stats$sysstat table. From this table we can get an accurate picture of memory and disk sorts.

rpt_sorts_alert.sql

set pages 9999;

column mydate heading 'Yr.  Mo Dy  Hr.' format a16
column sorts_memory  format 999,999,999
column sorts_disk    format 999,999,999
column ratio         format .99999

select
   to_char(snap_time,'yyyy-mm-dd HH24') mydate,
   newmem.value-oldmem.value sorts_memory,
   newdsk.value-olddsk.value sorts_disk,
   ((newdsk.value-olddsk.value)/(newmem.value-oldmem.value)) ratio
from
   perfstat.stats$sysstat oldmem,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat newmem,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat newdsk,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat olddsk,
   perfstat.stats$snapshot   sn
where
   newdsk.snap_id = sn.snap_id
and
   olddsk.snap_id = sn.snap_id-1
and
   newmem.snap_id = sn.snap_id
and
   oldmem.snap_id = sn.snap_id-1
and
   oldmem.name = 'sorts (memory)'
and
   newmem.name = 'sorts (memory)'
and
   olddsk.name = 'sorts (disk)'
and
   newdsk.name = 'sorts (disk)'
and
   newmem.value-oldmem.value > 0
   and
   newdsk.value-olddsk.value > 100
;

Here is the output from the script. Here, we can clearly see the number of memory sorts and disk sorts, and the ratio of disk to memory sorts.

Yr.  Mo Dy  Hr.  SORTS_MEMORY   SORTS_DISK   RATIO
---------------- ------------ ------------ -------
2001-12-20 12          13,166          166  .01261
2001-12-20 16          25,694          223  .00868
2001-12-21 10          99,183          215  .00217
2001-12-21 15          13,662          130  .00952
2001-12-21 16          17,004          192  .01129
2001-12-22 10          18,900          141  .00746
2001-12-22 11          19,487          131  .00672
2001-12-26 12          12,502          147  .01176
2001-12-27 13          20,338          118  .00580
2001-12-27 18          11,032          119  .01079
2001-12-28 16          16,514          205  .01241
2001-12-29 10          17,327          242  .01397
2001-12-29 16          50,874          167  .00328
2001-01-02 08          15,574          108  .00693
2001-01-02 10          39,052          136  .00348
2001-01-03 11          13,193          153  .01160
2001-01-03 13          19,901          104  .00523
2001-01-03 15          19,929          130  .00652

This report can be changed to send an alert when the number of disk sorts exceeds a predefined threshold, and we can also modify it to plot average sorts by hour of the day and day of the week. The script here computes average sorts, ordered by hour of the day:

rpt_avg_sorts_hr.sql

set pages 9999;

column sorts_memory  format 999,999,999
column sorts_disk    format 999,999,999
column ratio         format .99999

select
   to_char(snap_time,'HH24'),
   avg(newmem.value-oldmem.value) sorts_memory,
   avg(newdsk.value-olddsk.value) sorts_disk
from
   perfstat.stats$sysstat oldmem,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat newmem,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat newdsk,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat olddsk,
   perfstat.stats$snapshot   sn
where
   newdsk.snap_id = sn.snap_id
and
   olddsk.snap_id = sn.snap_id-1
and
   newmem.snap_id = sn.snap_id
and
   oldmem.snap_id = sn.snap_id-1
and
   oldmem.name = 'sorts (memory)'
and
   newmem.name = 'sorts (memory)'
and
   olddsk.name = 'sorts (disk)'
and
   newdsk.name = 'sorts (disk)'
and
   newmem.value-oldmem.value > 0
group by
   to_char(snap_time,'HH24')
;

Here is the output from the script. We can now take this data and create a graph in a spreadsheet.

TO SORTS_MEMORY   SORTS_DISK
-- ------------ ------------
00       18,855           11
01       19,546           15
02       10,128            5
03        6,503            8
04       10,410            4
05        8,920            5
06        8,302            7
07        9,124           27
08       13,492           71
09       19,449           55
10       19,812          106
11       17,332           78
12       20,566           76
13       17,130           46
14       19,071           61
15       19,494           68
16       20,701           79
17       19,478           44
18       23,364           29
19       13,626           20
20       11,937           17
21        8,467            7
22        8,432           10
23       11,587           10

Here is the plot from the output (Figure 9-16). Here we see a typical increase in sort activity during the online period of the day. Sorts rise about 8:00 a.m. and then go down after 6:00 p.m.

Figure 9-70: Average memory sorts by hour of the day

Now, let's run the script to compute the averages by the day of the week.

rpt_avg_sorts_dy.sql

set pages 9999;

column sorts_memory  format 999,999,999
column sorts_disk    format 999,999,999
column ratio         format .99999

select
   to_char(snap_time,'day')       DAY,
   avg(newmem.value-oldmem.value) sorts_memory,
   avg(newdsk.value-olddsk.value) sorts_disk
from
   perfstat.stats$sysstat oldmem,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat newmem,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat newdsk,
   perfstat.stats$sysstat olddsk,
   perfstat.stats$snapshot   sn
where
   newdsk.snap_id = sn.snap_id
and
   olddsk.snap_id = sn.snap_id-1
and
   newmem.snap_id = sn.snap_id
and
   oldmem.snap_id = sn.snap_id-1
and
   oldmem.name = 'sorts (memory)'
and
   newmem.name = 'sorts (memory)'
and
   olddsk.name = 'sorts (disk)'
and
   newdsk.name = 'sorts (disk)'
and
   newmem.value-oldmem.value > 0
group by
   to_char(snap_time,'day')
;

Again, we will take the result set and plot it in a chart. This time, let's plot the
disk sorts.

DAY       SORTS_MEMORY   SORTS_DISK
--------- ------------ ------------
friday          12,545           54
monday          14,352           29
saturday        12,430            2
sunday          13,807            4
thursday        17,042           47
tuesday         15,172           78
wednesday       14,650           43

Figure 9-17 shows the graph. In this database, the activity pattern on Tuesday shows a large number of disk sorts, with another smaller spike on Thursdays. For this database, the DBA may want to pay careful attention to the TEMP tablespaces on these days, and perhaps issue a alter tablespace TEMP coalesce; to create continuous extents in the TEMP tablespace.

Figure 9-71: Average disk sorts by day of the week

At the risk of being redundant, we need to reemphasize that the single most important factor in the performance of any Oracle database is the minimization of disk I/O. Hence, the tuning of the Oracle sorting remains one of the most important considerations in the tuning of any Oracle database.

Now, let's turn our attention to the Oracle rollback segments and see how we can use STATSPACK to monitor the rollback segments and tune them for optimal performance.


This is an excerpt from "Oracle High Performance tuning with STATSPACK" by Oracle Press.


If you like Oracle tuning, you may enjoy the new book "Oracle Tuning: The Definitive Reference", over 900 pages of BC's favorite tuning tips & scripts. 

You can buy it direct from the publisher for 30%-off and get instant access to the code depot of Oracle tuning scripts.

  
 

Oracle performance tuning software 
 
 
 
 

Oracle performance tuning book

 

 
 
 
Oracle performance Tuning 10g reference poster
 
 
 
Oracle training in Linux commands
 
Oracle training Excel
 
Oracle training & performance tuning books
 

 

   

Copyright © 1996 -  2014 by Burleson. All rights reserved.

Oracle® is the registered trademark of Oracle Corporation. 

Hit Counter